Friday, June 28, 2013

Venezuela: Aircraft That Disappeared on January 4 Found, Vittorio Missoni, Pilots, Guests Dead

According to EFE, the Venezuelan government announced yesterday (June 27) that the wreckage of a small general aviation aircraft that went missing on January 4, 2013, with the oldest son of Italian fashion designer Ottavio Missoni aboard has been found. 

Vittorio Missoni, his wife, Maurizia Castiglioni; and two other Italian nationals were on board, as well as the pilot and co-pilot, when the twin-engine aircraft went missing over Caribbean waters and within Venezuelan airspace.

Vittorio, 58, was the oldest son of Ottavio Missoni, founder of a high-end fashion house and a luxury hotel chain bearing the family name. Italian media described Vittorio, the fashion house’s marketing director, as the Missoni brand’s global ambassador. The Missoni couple and their friends had been on vacation in the Los Roques archipelago beginning on December 28, 2012, and had been scheduled to return to Italy on the night of January 4.

COMMENT:  Vittorio, 58, was the oldest son of Ottavio Missoni, founder of a high-end fashion house and a luxury hotel chain bearing the family name. Italian media described Vittorio, the fashion house’s marketing director, as the Missoni brand’s global ambassador. 

The Missoni company announced on June 27 that the crashed plane of Italian fashion icon Vittorio Missoni has been found in the waters north of the Los Roques Archipelago.

The Missoni family and Venezuelan authorities had been searching for the plane since it went missing shortly after it took off from the coast of Venezuela on January 4, 2013.

The fashion house told the media that “On behalf of the Missoni, Castiglioni, Foresti, and Scalvenzi families, it is confirmed that the airplane number YV615BN-2A, which disappeared on January 4, 2013, with Vittorio Missoni, Maurizia Castiglioni, Guido Foresti, Elda Scalvenzi, pilot Hernan José Marchan and co-pilot Juan Carlos Ferrer Milano on board, has been found.”

The aircraft was identified on the fifth day of the search mission, thanks to the technology of the American oceanographic ship, the "Deep Sea."

As a side note, the Missoni Family has been demanding answers as to why a 44-year-old aircraft, which had a history of mechanical problems, was being used to transport VIPs.

The answers can be found by shoddy or non-existent executive security protocols that could easily have been addressed through a detailed "advance" of security arrangements. Had an executive security specialist been tasked with conducting a thorough "advance," the Missonis and their guests would be alive today.

Normally, a detailed "advance" examines such details as the aircraft's safety, accident and maintenance records; accidents in the pilots' flight history;  verification of commercial pilot credentials; insurance; air worthiness certificates; and interviews of both pilots.

Such an advance (which examines every minute detail pertaining to transportation) could easily have ensured that the Missonis and their guests were traveling on aircraft with impeccable safety records. Sadly, this was not the case.

Unfortunately, this crash which claimed the lives of  the Missonis and their guests was very preventable, as someone at the Venezuelan end of the trip skipped crucial details pertaining to aircraft safety and security. 

The location of the aircraft came one week after Venezuelan authorities found another small plane that had disappeared on Jan. 4, 2008, with 14 people on board, including eight Italians. That flight had gone missing when the plane was en route from Caracas to Los Roques.