Monday, December 30, 2013

Global Impact: Yes, Forcible Rape, Sexual Assault is Avoidable...with Moderation

According to The Sunday Mirror, three British women have been raped in the past seven days in the  party town of Malia, which is on Crete.

Crete is the largest island in Greece and the fifth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. It is located in the southern part of the Aegean Sea separating the Aegean from the Libyan Sea.  

With its countless bars which encourage the consumption of cheap booze and all-night debauchery, it’s easy to see why Malia is a magnet for young Brits wanting to have fun in the sun absent of the parental oversight that most young adults are accustomed to.

COMMENT: Sadly, the abundance of endless alcohol seemingly also attracts one of the dark sides of sexual misconduct: rapists! 

If there happen to be any British parents reading this posting, and I hope there are, I would suggest that they go to the below link:

http://stayingsafeabroad.blogspot.com/2013/06/global-impact-1-in-10-british-women

Additionally, I would suggest that parents read my postings of June 26, July 23, July 25, July 28 and July 31, all of which describe unleashed debauchery and rowdy behavior on the part of Britain's "finest" that few British parents could be proud of.

Another important link that I suggest that British parents review is the following:

http://stayingsafeabroad.blogspot.com/2013/07/greece-briton-19-stabbed-to-death-on 

The above link tragically documents the murder of a British youth dead before his time. Thus, I quote from my posting of July 25, 2013:

"According to The Northhampton Chronicle and Echo, Myles Litchmore-Dunbar, 19, has been formally charged on Crete with the murder of Tyrell Matthews-Burton, from Leyton, East London, as well as possession of a weapon in Malia in the early hours of Tuesday morning (July 23).

More than a dozen British tourists have also appeared in court after an alleged mass brawl in which Matthews-Burton was pinned down and stabbed to death "execution-style."

According to his profile on a modeling website, Litchmore-Dunbar has just finished his first year studying for an economics degree in Northampton. Additionally, he was also a part-time model.

Our condolences and sympathies go out to Tyrell's family, particularly considering his life was so short and it had to end so unnecessarily, fueled by unchecked drinking that may have contributed to his death.

The coroner in Crete, Dr. Manolis Michalodimitrakis, has said the murder victim suffered two stab wounds, to the back and to the chest. Dr. Michalodimitrakis emphasized that there were no defensive wounds.

The knife wielded by  punctured his lung and heart. He lost half of his blood.

As for Myles Litchmore-Dunbar, the man that ended Tyrell's young life, his lack of clear judgment and too much alcohol has resulted in his promising life and career being essentially over, as he no doubt will be spending many years to come in prison."

In a previous posting, I was quoted as saying: "Locals claim police are turning a blind eye to the attacks, leading to vigilante justice, and many victims do not even bother to report attacks or were too drunk to remember the details. 

Londoner Nikki Howarth, 27, who manages Malia’s Candy Club bar told THE SUNDAY MIRROR: Howarth said, “You always get fights in Malia, but what is worrying me at the moment is the rapes. I’m telling girls to be careful because we have had three rapes in the last week...One British girl was set upon by three Israeli guys. She went home the next day. Most girls don’t even report it....One of the girls this week was found being raped by a stranger in one of the nightclubs by two bouncers."

Official statistics on rape in Crete are difficult to come by, but according to the most recent records there were 25 reports of rapes on British women in 2011. Yet, for those who live and work in Malia fear the true number is much higher.

The number of Britons sexually attacked or raped abroad rose 10% last year to 310 from 281 cases in 2011. Greece, Spain, and Turkey had the worst records.

A quotation from THE SUNDAY MIRROR: "Everywhere British teens [can be seen] wearing as little as possible, of both sexes, and are desperate to drink more and sleep with more people than their friends...The human cost is obvious at the Central Malia Medical Center where, on average, 50 Britons a night turn up. A weary medic at the center admitted the place was like a war zone at times....Interestingly, as many as 100 girls a week arrive asking for the morning-after pill. One pharmacist said: “It’s like we’re giving out candy. They should have a ­prescription, but the truth is we don’t bother because it takes too long. It’s easier not to ask questions.” 

As expected, the British Foreign Office said it has not received any reports of Brits being raped in Malia. Do diplomats live on Mars?

In light of the above, I strongly suggest the follow:

1. Parents should take an active role in knowing where their young adult children are, particularly those who are under-age, and the details of who they are planning to be with, where they are staying and how they can be reached by phone;

2. Parents should ensure that their young adult off-spring have subscribed to international medical treatment and evacuation coverage in the event they become seriously ill or injured;

3. If at all possible, parents should take an active role in ensuring that their young adult children go abroad, particularly for the first time, with close friends;

4. Parents should honestly discuss "safe-sex" with their adult children, including the phone numbers 0f the British consulate, local police, nearest hospital, etc.;

5. Parents should instruct their sexually-active young adult children that if they are raped or sexual assaulted they should report an occurrence to the British consulate;

6. Young adults who have not drank alcoholic beverages before should drink in moderation, knowing that if they do so, the end-result might well be becoming a crime victim;

7. Young adults should be advised of the number of British women who have been raped or sexually assaulted in Southern Europe in recent years;

8. Parents should provide their young adult children on how to call them in an emergency;

9. All parents should provide advice to their children if raped or sexually assaulted, with the assistance of police or medical professionals if necessary; and

10. Many European youths engage in a high-risk game Spanish police call "balconing," whereby intoxicated youths jump from one balcony to another in a twisted game of bravado often resulting in permanent injury or death.

If at all possible, parents should ensure that their offspring rent only ground-level accommodations to reduce the risk of "balcony jumping."