Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Tip of the Day: How to Learn to Survive From Contemporary History

As most of you know by now, I have always been committed to learning from the past, even if an event occurred several years ago.

The case-study I'm going to share with you as a learning opportunity occurred in Nanjing, China in April 2000, a city of 3.6 million at the time.

A German expatriate employed by Daimler-Benz AG in Nanjing, his wife and their two children, ages 14 and 12, were at home in their villa doing what most families do, enjoying being together.

At one juncture, the family heard footsteps on the second floor of their home and surmised that with the entire family on the first floor, they concluded that it was intruders on the second floor.

COMMENT: Burglary is a common occurrence in China with most encounters between families and intruders rarely ending particularly well.

Looking at my own life experience in living abroad in lots of different countries, the FIRST thing that would have entered my mind was to promptly call promptly local police so that they knew that a burglary was in-progress and leave the home entirely and seek the safety of neighbors.

Unfortunately, the expat did what I strongly recommend AGAINST families doing: 

The German expat incorrectly went upstairs to investigate, when he in fact should have gathered his entire family and LEFT their home to seek refuge with neighbors. 

A long story made shorter, the German expat strangely walked upstairs to the second floor to investigate. Not a good decision.

Even if the family had lost many of their possessions and valuables, the personal safety of one's family is paramount! 

Instead, the German husband walked into a darkened room only to be summarily stabbed in the chest, resulting in his death by two intruders.

Even worse, the intruders than went down to the first floor and killed the expat's wife and two children, believing that any witness left alive potentially would lead to their imminent arrest.

It is my hope that all of our readers, if they find themselves in a similar situation, call the police, avoid a confrontation with intruders and seek safety with neighbors.





page60image17064
page60image17336
page60image17608
page60image17880
page60image18152
page60image18424
page60image18696
page61image608
page61image880
page61image1152
page61image1424
page61image1696
page61image1968
page61image2240
page61image2512



page61image18504
page61image18776
page62image608
page62image880
page62image1152
page62image1424
page62image1696
page62image1968
page62image2240
page62image2512



page62image16032
page62image16304
page62image16576
page62image16848
page62image17120
page62image17392
page62image17664
page63image608
page63image880
page63image1152
page63image1424
page63image1696
page63image1968
page63image2240
page63image2512

At the time of the bur- glary, the family of four was downstairs. When they heard the footsteps on the second floor (and recognized them as evidence of an intruder), the family should have left the house and gone to a neighbor’s home to call the police. Even if the family members had lost some of their belongings, they would at least have been alive to replace them. 

No comments: